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Can a Never-Trump Republican Win an Election That Comes down to Who Can Get Trump’s Support?

Alabama Senate candidate Mo Brooks may be regretting his past attacks on President Trump, now that he needs his support.

Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) is one of several Republicans running in Alabama’s special election to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ vacated seat, and may find it difficult to win the Republican nomination given his previous statements regarding President Trump during the 2016 election.

The New York Times published a piece on Sunday titled, “Alabama’s Special Senate Election Is All About Wooing Trump,” which pointed out, “the contest may boil down to a single question: How will President Trump respond to the candidate who denounced him for ‘serial adultery’?”

Brooks is the Alabama Senate candidate that the Times is referring to, having accused Trump of “serial adultery.”

However, that isn’t the only criticism Brooks has lobbed at Trump during 2016 election.

During an interview on “The Dale Jackson Show” in January 2016, Brooks said that Trump is not a conservative. He also attacked Trump for New York City values.

“[Trump’s] also bombastic. He’s also a creature of the entertainment society on the left coast. He’s also from New York City, with the kinds of values that people in New York City have, that are often quite different than the kinds of values over the rest of the country that they belittle by calling flyover country, to go from east coast to west coast and back.”

In that same interview Brooks attacked Trump for his shifting positions: “with respect to Donald Trump, why would you believe what he says about his current positions, given so many different positions he’s taken on those very same issues, conflicting positions over the last few years?”

During an interview on MSNBC in February 2016, Brooks criticized Trump for going through bankruptcy, and attacked Trump for making a “fortune taking advantage of people with his gambling casinos.”

After Trump had won the Republican primary in Alabama Brooks blamed Jeff Sessions for Trump’s victory during an interview on “The Dale Jackson Show.”

“I put Jeff Sessions as number one in helping Donald Trump in Alabama,” Brooks told Dale Jackson. It should be pointed out that Sessions ran unopposed in both the 2014 Republican primary and the 2014 general election for his Alabama Senate seat.

That same month Brooks accused Trump of committing “serial adultery:”

“‘It’s not just adultery, its serial adultery and there’s a difference. If you make one mistake, it’s one thing. But if you make dozens or hundreds of those kinds of deeds and then you boast about it in writing, that’s another thing,’ Brooks said. ‘It’s not necessarily the sexual act itself, it’s the honor. I want someone in the White House who is honorable. I believe honesty integrity and honor are important attributes for president of the United States.’”

When Trump finally won the Republican nomination for president, Brooks was a reluctant supporter of Trump at best, refusing to even endorse Trump.

The Montgomery Advertiser reported on Brooks non-endorsement of Trump:

“He drew a distinction between ‘voting for’ and ‘endorsing.’ ‘When I’m endorsing somebody, that means I’m putting my reputation behind that person’s candidacy and I’m all in, I’ll help them raise money, I’ll help them by volunteering, like I did with Ted Cruz,’ Brooks said. So does that mean he’s not endorsing Trump? ‘I have stated what I’m going to do and people can infer what they wish from that,’ Brooks said. ‘I’m not saying anything further other than what I said in that regard.’”

Trump won the state of Alabama by 28 points in the general election, on his way to winning the presidency.

Now, if the New York Times is correct in its assessment that Alabama’s special election will come down to which Republican can garnish Trump’s support, it will appear that Brooks has some apologizing to do.

However, this may be more difficult today than it would have been previously, given Brooks’ defense of an endorsement he received from the Courageous Conservatives PAC, an organization with anti-Trump origins.