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Elizabeth Warren is Tailoring her College Experience to Appease the Far Left

A review of Warren’s new book and past speeches reveals that she often leaves out key aspects of her college education when speaking in public.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) is out with a new book, “This Fight Is Our Fight: The Battle to Save America’s Middle Class,” in which she goes into detail about how she was able to attend one of the nation’s most expensive private universities. But a review of recent speeches given by Warren reveals that the Massachusetts senator often leaves out this part of her college story when speaking in public.

In a section of the book’s first chapter titled, “Young Dreams,” Warren described how her family couldn’t afford to send her to college. Warren explains how she saved money, she waitressed and babysat to pay for the application fees for two colleges: Northwestern University and George Washington University. Warren explained that she applied to these schools because they offered debate scholarships.

Warren described the excitement she felt when acceptance letters from both universities arrived:

“Then I ripped open the second letter, from George Washington University, and-wow!-it was offering a full scholarship and a federal loan. That was all I needed to know: then and there I decided to become a GW Colonial. I had never seen either school, and I didn’t know how I’d get to Washington or where I would live, but even so, I was headed to GW!”

She then explained why, after two years of college, she dropped out to marry her first husband, Jim Warren:

“On Labor Day weekend before I headed back for my junior year at GW, my first boyfriend (and the first boy to dump me) dropped back into my life. He was now twenty-two, a college grad with a good job, and evidently, he had decided it was time to get married. He proposed, and about a nanosecond later, I said yes. At nineteen, I said hello, housewife; and goodbye, college. It definitely was not the smartest move I ever made.”

However, Warren often elects to leave out these significant details about her college education when she speaks to groups. Warren, rather, often tells a story about how she attended a nearby commuter college, which cost only $50 per semester.

During an event promoting the College For All Act on April 3, Warren elected to leave out that she attended George Washington University for two years when talking about her college education.

“By the time I was in high school, there was no chance that I was going to get to go to college. We didn’t have the money for an application for college, much less the kind of money to send me off to college,” Warren told the crowd.

“But for me, the chance turned out to be a commuter college that cost $50 a semester,” she said. “And that commuter college opened a door for me, and that door opened another and another.”

Then, on April 13, during a town hall in Salem, Massachusetts, Warren again elected to leave out that she attended George Washington University, instead telling the audience only about her commuter college experience.

The examples of Warren omitting the fact that she attended one of the nation’s most expensive private universities while speaking in public are numerous.

NTK’s staff could only find two examples of Warren talking about her time at George Washington University in recent years, and one of those came in 2013 while Warren was speaking at George Washington University.

While it’s true that Warren’s family couldn’t afford to send her to college, and it’s true she attended the commuter college, and she has mentioned attending George Washington University in previous books, her decision to leave out key details about her experience when speaking in public is revealing.

In Warren’s case, the system worked for her as it does for many Americans. But that’s not the story she tells when speaking to young progressives who are demanding free college for all.

Does Warren leave out these details when speaking in public because she wants to appear more relatable to young progressives, or is it because she is embarrassed that she was able to attend George Washington University, a school consistently ranked among the most expensive colleges in America? Could it be because it’s harder to sell her “rigged system” argument when the system worked for her personally?

No matter the answer, Warren is selectively leaving out key parts of her college experience when speaking to progressive groups, and that is almost certainly not by accident.