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Future of the Dem Party: 4 White Guys Who Lost Within the Last Year?

Is the future of the Democratic Party really in the hands of Jon Ossoff, Jason Kander, Tom Perriello, and Pete Buttigieg?

Jon Ossoff Vote Record

Since Democrats’ agonizing defeat in November 2016, the party has been in search of a cohesive message and an electoral path out of the wilderness.

With Republicans controlling the White House and both chambers of Congress, Democrats must decide if their efforts are better served broadening the party and winning back white, working-class voters, or if they should double down on minority support.

To that end, FiveThirtyEight analyzed the tactics of four white, male Democrats who are all “taking stylistic cues from the dominating political figure of their era, President Obama.”

But the four men, Jon Ossoff, Jason Kander, Tom Perriello, and Pete Buttigieg, also have one other thing in common: they’ve all lost elections within the last year.

More troubling for Democrats, though, could be what these men represent. In June, a group of African-American women penned a letter criticizing DNC Chair Tom Perez for ignoring the Black community during his post-2016 outreach. That frustration within the party continues today:

There’s a risk that in hyping the effort to win back white Obama/Trump voters, black candidates get lost in the shuffle or female candidates are passed over because of a Hillary Clinton hangover.

And FiveThirtyEight points out that there are a whole host of minority candidates (Nina Turner, Stacey Abrams, and Ben Jealous, to name a few) who could be receiving national attention, but are being passed over for white men.

In the end, Democrats will have to choose between trying to broaden the party and win back those white working-class voters, or double down on the support they already have in minority communities and increase turnout among those groups.

More than halfway into Trump’s first year in office, it’s not clear which path Democrats will choose.