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Starbucks CEO Continues to Lay Ground for Progressive Political Run

With his most recent foray into the political realm, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz still looks interested in a political run.

Howard Schultz Political Campaign

In response to President Trump’s executive order establishing a pause in immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz issued a political platform in the guise of a company memorandum, an indicator that he may be building on his previous steps toward a political run.

In a message to Starbucks employees, Schultz laid out support for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, the Affordable Care Act, “building bridges, not walls, with Mexico,” and a business plan to hire 10,000 refugees.

However, the part of Schultz’s message that sounded the most like a political speech came at its closing:

We are in business to inspire and nurture the human spirit, one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time – whether that neighborhood is in a Red State or a Blue State; a Christian country or a Muslim country; a divided nation or a united nation. That will not change. You have my word on that.

Schultz channeled President Obama’s 2004 DNC speech, which catapulted the then-Illinois State Senator to national prominence, in this final passage.

At the 2004 DNC, in his first major speech on the national stage, Obama said:

The pundits, the pundits like to slice and dice our country into red states and blue States: red states for Republicans, blue States for Democrats. But I’ve got news for them, too. We worship an awesome God in the blue states, and we don’t like federal agents poking around our libraries in the red states. We coach little league in the blue states and, yes, we’ve got some gay friends in the red states.

Previously, Schultz told Alec Baldwin that he was considering a political run in September, and following Trump’s election victory in November, Schultz gave a speech criticizing the current state of political affairs in the United States.