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The 3 Most Reprehensible Things Mylan’s CEO (Joe Manchin’s Daughter) Told the NYT

Drug maker Mylan came under fire for price gouging its life-saving EpiPen, but it’s so much worse than that…

Mylan CEO Heather Bresch

Just last year, Mylan, the company responsible for the life-saving EpiPen, faced a firing squad of consumers upset with the company’s decision to more than double the price of its EpiPen in a four-year span.

This weekend, the New York Times asked Heather Bresch, Sen. Joe Manchin’s (D-WV) daughter, about these complaints and other issues with the company. Below are three of the most jarring anecdotes from that report.

Employees Concerned About the Price Jump Were Rudely Dismissed.

[Mylan Chairman Robert] Coury replied that he was untroubled. He raised both his middle fingers and explained, using colorful language, that anyone criticizing Mylan, including its employees, ought to go copulate with themselves. Critics in Congress and on Wall Street, he said, should do the same. And regulators at the Food and Drug Administration? They, too, deserved a round of anatomically challenging self-fulfillment.

When the executives conveyed their anxieties to other leaders, including the chief executive, Heather Bresch, these, too, were brushed off, they told me.

Mylan Produced a Dangerous TV Ad That Gravely Misled Consumers About its Product. The Ad was Removed From the Airwaves Almost Immediately.

Before the birthday advertisement aired, the ad went through multiple internal review processes. Mylan executives told Ms. Bresch that the commercial was improper. One employee went so far as to send an internal email saying the advertisement would increase the frequency of allergic reactions, according to a person who saw the correspondence.

Ms. Bresch disagreed. She said it was better to act boldly, according to a former executive who participated in that conversation.

Thanks to Employees Speaking Out, Mylan’s Culture is Under Scrutiny, but Bresch Wouldn’t Change a Thing.

(And then there was the time, in 2013, when Mr. Coury, at a Goldman Sachs conference, indicated his dislike for hypothetical questions by saying that “if your aunt had balls, she’d be your uncle.”)

In our interview, Ms. Bresch said there was nothing in Mylan’s culture she would change.