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The Photos of Jeff Sessions No One is Talking About

The Alabama Senator, who Trump nominated to be Attorney General, is being accused of racism…

Sessions in Selma

Protesters filed into Sen. Jeff Sessions’ (R-AL) Mobile office on Tuesday and planted themselves there all day for a sit-in, to demonstrate their opposition to his nomination to lead the Department of Justice under President-elect Donald Trump.

“As a matter of conscience and conviction, we can neither be mute nor mumble our opposition to Sen. Jefferson Beauregard Sessions becoming attorney general of the United States,” Cornell William Brooks, NAACP President and CEO, said in a statement.

Brooks was among six protestors arrested on Tuesday, though about 30 protestors participated in the sit-in and left before police began making arrests.

Many who know Sessions well have fought to debunk the notion that Sessions is racist in any way. One is Albert Turner, Jr., the son of the man at the center of a controversial case in which Sessions charged both of Turner’s parents with tampering absentee ballots.

“I have known Senator Sessions for many years, beginning with the voter fraud case in Perry County in which my parents were defendants,” Turner said. “My differences in policy and ideology with him do not translate to personal malice. He is not a racist.”

Another topic rarely raised about Sessions is that he marched in the streets of Selma alongside civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the original march:

Jeff Sessions In Selma

Helpfully, Ann Corkery provides just a few details on Sessions’ background in a RealClearPolitics piece last month:

He led Senate efforts in 2015 to honor the 50th anniversary of the 1965 “Bloody Sunday” civil rights march in Selma and participated in the commemorative march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. He sponsored legislation to award the Congressional Gold Medal to Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, and Coretta Scott King, He was one of just 19 Republican senators who voted to confirm the first African-American U.S. attorney general (Eric Holder). He passed the Fair Sentencing Act of 2010 to remedy racial disparities in sentencing, winning the praise of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights for his efforts.

But that record of fighting for all of Alabama doesn’t help Democrats, who are attempting to smear Session in an effort to score points. Which is likely why you don’t see photos like this circulated by leftwing groups:

Jeff Sessions In Selma