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Winning (with Dems): 3 Trump Policies That Can Win Over the Other Side

A wide-ranging Quinnipiac poll reveals which policies both Republicans and Democrats support — would Trump’s embrace of these priorities calm the partisan furor in the U.S.?

A new Quinnipiac poll released Wednesday covers how Americans feel about a range of policies under consideration by the Trump administration. Three, in particular, would win over a significant portion of Republicans and Democrats. Is this the way forward for Trump, in a hyper-partisan time for America?

#1: DEFENDING NATO ALLIES

Seventy-nine percent of American voters nationwide — including 71 percent of Republicans and 87 percent of Democrats — say Trump should “defend all of America’s NATO allies, if necessary.”

Trump has sent mixed signals on NATO. On the one hand, he told the U.S. Central Command in Florida that “[w]e strongly support NATO,” after months on the campaign trail blasting countries that don’t contribute two percent of their GDP to defense.

On that subject, though, Trump also blasted French President Francois Hollande on NATO spending, according to a report from Politico. The report claims Trump told Hollande the U.S. “wants our money back” over NATO.

#2: RENEGOTIATING TRADE DEALS

Sixty percent of Americans — including 75 percent of Republicans and 39 percent of Democrats — support “renegotiating major trade deals with other countries, even if it means paying more for what you buy.”

Trump withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) in the first full week of his presidency, and wants to renegotiate NAFTA with Canada and Mexico.

#3: INFRASTRUCTURE SPENDING

This one features a startling level of agreement. Eighty-nine percent of voters — 87 percent of Republicans, and 94 percent of Democrats — support “increasing federal spending for roads, bridges, mass transit and other infrastructure.”

One way or another, Trump wants $1 trillion in infrastructure spending over the next 10 years. His team is considering $137 billion in tax credits that economists argue would spur $1 trillion in spending, but others note there has to be some “way of generating revenue” to attract private investors.

Either way, look out for infrastructure spending to be a top priority for Trump in his first term — and, possibly, one of the few points of bipartisan agreement in Washington.