DNC Chief: Not My Place to Say, But Some 2020 Candidates Should ‘Move On’ | NTK Network DNC Chief: Not My Place to Say, But Some 2020 Candidates Should ‘Move On’

DNC Chief: Not My Place to Say, But Some 2020 Candidates Should ‘Move On’

Many 2020 Democrats are grumbling about the DNC’s rules for making the debate stage.

By NTK Staff | 06.11.2019 @4:55pm
DNC Chief: Not My Place to Say, But Some 2020 Candidates Should ‘Move On’

MThe Democratic National Committee (DNC) set clear rules on how candidates can become eligible to appear on the debate stage for the first presidential debate on June 26-27.

But that’s not stopping many Democratic candidates from complaining about it.

“It’s a ‘Hunger Games’ situation,” Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) told reporters over the weekend, according to the New York Times. “I’ll start with that.”

Sen. Michael Bennet (D-CO) said the rules are “distorting what people would ordinarily do” on the campaign trail, while Gov. Steve Bullock (D-MT) complained that the DNC “changed the debate rules.” Gov. Jay Inslee (D-WA) loudly complained when his request for a debate focused solely on climate change was denied.

All of the complaining is starting to rub party leaders the wrong way. In fact, Perez indicated that it might be time for some candidates to think about dropping out:

The bellyaching is beginning to frustrate some party leaders, including Tom Perez, the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, who said candidates are trying to “work the referees” through their griping.

Though candidates complain that the committee is trying to prematurely winnow the field, Mr. Perez said he expected the number of candidates to remain in the double digits well into the fall.

“Over time, candidates who are not moving up in the polls are going to have to make judgments about when they believe it’s in their best interest to move on, but it’s not my place to tell them when,” he said.

That remark likely won’t sit well with many 2020 Democrats. They feel hamstrung by the DNC’s rules and the sheer number of contenders.

For instance, during an event in Iowa over the weekend, 19 candidates were given 5 minutes each to address a crowd of the party faithful. Many members would have preferred a longer speech allotment, but event organizers needed to be cognizant of attendees’ time.

Ultimately, of course, Perez is correct that some candidates will begin to see the writing on the wall. But this early in the game, everyone thinks they still have a chance. And until they know they’re out, expect the complaining to continue.

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