Eight Years Later, Warren Returns to Everett Mills and Still Faces Questions About Her Ancestry | NTK Network Eight Years Later, Warren Returns to Everett Mills and Still Faces Questions About Her Ancestry

Eight Years Later, Warren Returns to Everett Mills and Still Faces Questions About Her Ancestry

"I grew up on family stories about who I am. It's something we just talk about in my family. As I've said, it's part of who we are."

By NTK Staff | 02.08.2019 @2:38pm
Eight Years Later, Warren Returns to Everett Mills and Still Faces Questions About Her Ancestry

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) is expected to formally announce her 2020 presidential campaign on Saturday in Lawrence, Massachusett at the Everett Mills, a site where eight years ago Warren faced tough questions about her heritage, questions she still hasn’t been able to adequately answer.

For years, Warren claimed to have Native American ancestry but was unable to provide verifiable proof.

In an attempt to quell questions about her heritage before her presidential campaign announcement, Warren released the results of a DNA test, which were roundly criticized.

This week, the Washington Post published Warren’s 1986 registration card for the State Bar of Texas. On the form, she identified as “American Indian,’ triggering a fresh set of questions for the Massachusetts Democrat.

Reporters even questioned whether Warren had considered dropping out of the 2020 presidential race because of the Washington Post report.

It doesn’t appear Warren has any interest in ending her presidential campaign before it starts, as she’s still scheduled to make a “big announcement” on Saturday at the Everett Mills.

In May 2012, the Eagle Tribune reported on a campaign event then-Democratic Senate candidate Warren held at the Everett Mills at which “questions about her Native American heritage continued to dog” her campaign.

The Eagle Tribune reported:

After proclaiming her allegiance to organized labor and working families in a speech to about 100 people in the sixth-floor exhibition hall on Friday, Warren reiterated that her designation as a Native American in a book on law professors back in the 1980s and 1990s was based on family lore.

“I’m proud of my heritage,” she told reporters after making remarks at the breakfast gathering. “I grew up on family stories about who I am. It’s something we just talk about in my family. As I’ve said, it’s part of who we are.”

Eight years later, Warren returns to the Everett Mills and questions about her heritage continue to dog her campaign, and it doesn’t look like they will go away.

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