FLASHBACK: Nadler: It's 'Grossly Unfair' for the Judiciary Committee to See an Unredacted Report | NTK Network FLASHBACK: Nadler: It’s ‘Grossly Unfair’ for the Judiciary Committee to See an Unredacted Report

FLASHBACK: Nadler: It’s ‘Grossly Unfair’ for the Judiciary Committee to See an Unredacted Report

"It is grossly unfair because...the entire committee on the Judiciary is going to see it, to decide what must be kept confidential..."

By NTK Staff | 04.09.2019 @3:40pm

House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerry Nadler (D-NY) has called for Attorney General William Barr to provide the House Judiciary with an unredacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s final report and the underlying evidence. But in 1998, Nadler thought providing such an unredacted report to the Judiciary Committee would violate Americans’ privacy rights, calling it “grossly unfair.”

On September 11, 1998, the House of Representatives was debating H.R. 525, which called for the immediate public release of independent counsel Ken Starr’s 445-page report on then-President Bill Clinton’s sex scandal.

But, the resolution also gave the House Judiciary Committee until September 28, 1998 “to review thousands of pages of appendixes and other material submitted by Starr,” according to the Baltimore Sun.

“What is at issue here this morning is not his conduct but the fairness of the resolution before us, which is manifestly and grossly unfair,” Nadler said during the floor debate. “It is manifestly unfair because it denies the President the privilege we have given to every other person accused, as the gentleman from Michigan stated, the ability to see the accusation before it is released publicly so he can prepare a response.”

“It is grossly unfair because, with respect to the 2,200 pages of evidence and the 17 boxes of other evidence, the entire committee on the Judiciary is going to see it, to decide what must be kept confidential and protecting privacy of third parties. That means 50 people are going to see it. It is going to leak out. Those privacy rights are going to be violated. That is ensured by this resolution,” Nadler continued.

“It is grossly unfair because, during the 10 or 20 days that that is going to be done, while the world will see salacious details, the President will not be allowed to look at those documents,” Nadler said. “There is no reason why he should not. There is no delay entailed.’

“But this resolution is doing everything it can to make the president’s defense as difficult as possible and to make it very likely that all the details that the special prosecutor himself says should be protected for privacy reasons will leak out, because 50 people in this town cannot keep a secret,” Nadler said.

Nadler then went on to complain that 50 people would not have the time to look through those 80,000 or 90,000 pages to decide what should be kept secret.

H.R. 525 passed by an overwhelming majority 363-63. Nadler, along with current Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), were among the Democratic no votes on the resolution.

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