Meet the 7 (Potentially 8) New U.S. Senators Meet the 7 (Potentially 8) New U.S. Senators – NTK Network

Meet the 7 (Potentially 8) New U.S. Senators

The 2018 midterm elections put at least seven, and potentially eight, new U.S. senators in the nation's upper legislative chamber. Learn more about them here.

By NTK Staff | 11.14.2018 @12:00pm
Meet the 7 (Potentially 8) New U.S. Senators

The dust is beginning to settle on the 2018 midterm elections, and the 100-member U.S. Senate will have at least seven new members come 2019. They may have an eighth, too, pending the results of the Florida U.S. Senate recount.

NTK Network is introducing our readers to the new senators, divvied up by three different categories: the ‘Trump class’ that won in part thanks to their allyship with the president, the ‘elephants in the room’ that come to the Senate as national GOP figures, and the ‘women of the West’ in the Democratic caucus.

THE TRUMP CLASS

Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO)

  • The result: Hawley 51.5%, McCaskill 45.5%
  • Recent presidential elections in state: Trump +18.7 (2016), Romney +9.4 (2012), McCain +0.1 (2008)
  • Top donors by industry: real estate, securities & investment, law, manufacturing
  • What he ran on: Hawley ran on ending McCaskill’s long reign as Missouri’s U.S. senator and on supporting the agenda of a president whom Missouri elected by nearly 20 points in 2016. His campaign attracted a lot of national GOP interest, so look for Hawley to make an early splash.

Sen. Mike Braun (R-IN)

  • The result: Braun 51.0%, Donnelly 45.1%
  • Recent presidential elections in state: Trump +18.9 (2016), Romney +10.2 (2012), Obama +1.0 (2008)
  • Top donors by industry: securities & investment, auto, law, health, real estate
  • What he ran on: Braun ran on supporting the president’s agenda and on being a ‘doer’ compared to the vanquished Donnelly. Braun defeated two U.S. House members in his primary before easily handling the one-term Democratic senator, so expect Braun to take the anti-establishment label and run with it into Washington.

Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN)

  • The result: Blackburn 54.7%, Bredesen 43.9%
  • Recent presidential elections in state: Trump +26 (2016), Romney +20.4 (2012), McCain +15.1 (2008)
  • Top donors by industry: securities, real estate, health, law, oil and gas, TV/movies/music
  • What she ran on: After some drama over whether or not a popular Democrat, ex-Gov. Phil Bredesen (D-TN), could still win statewide in Tennessee, Blackburn definitively answered the question by trouncing Bredesen last Tuesday. Blackburn ran on supporting Trump’s agenda, especially on immigration. She’ll also be Tennessee’s first female U.S. senator, and one of three new women in the class.

Sen. Kevin Cramer (R-ND)

  • The result: Cramer 55.4%, Heitkamp 44.6%
  • Recent presidential elections in state: Trump +35.8 (2016), Romney +19.6 (2012), McCain +8.7 (2008)
  • Top donors by industry: securities, oil and gas, real estate, crop production
  • What he ran on: Cramer’s race became less and less dramatic as time went on, and he eventually easily retired Democrat Heidi Heitkamp. Cramer did not hug Trump nearly as much as Hawley, Braun, or Blackburn, but did run as a supporter of the president. Cramer also has experience quietly representing North Dakota in Congress, so expect him to continue to be a member focused on local issues and the state’s interests.

THE ELEPHANTS IN THE ROOM

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT)

  • The result: Romney 63.2%, Wilson 30.4%
  • Recent presidential elections in state: Trump +18 (2016), Romney +48 (2012), McCain +28.2 (2008)
  • Top donors by industry: securities, real estate
  • What he ran on: Romney ran as a favorite son of Utah, even though his last job in public service was as Massachusetts governor. Romney’s ties to the state run deep, though, and that showed in his easy election win. The new senator will instantly be a national leader in the GOP and potentially a counterweight to Trump (filling a void left by the retiring Jeff Flake and Bob Corker).

Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL)*

  • The result: Scott 50.1%, Nelson 49.9%
  • Recent presidential elections in state: Trump +1.2 (2016), Obama +0.9 (2012), Obama +2.8 (2008)
  • Top donors by industry: real estate, law, securities, health
  • What he ran on: NTK Network includes an asterisk here because Scott’s win is pending a recount in Florida, but should the outgoing governor take a Senate seat, he’ll also be a national figure in the GOP. Scott’s been a popular governor and prolific fundraiser for years and will make a splash in Washington.

THE “WOMEN OF THE WEST”

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ)

  • The result: Sinema 49.7%, McSally 48.0%
  • Recent presidential elections in state: Trump +3.6 (2016), Romney +9.1 (2012), McCain +8.5 (2008)
  • Top donors by industry: law, securities, real estate, education, health
  • What she ran on: Named one of Chuck Schumer’s “Women of the West” in a Tuesday tweet, Sinema won a dramatic election for the old seat of Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ). She’s a self-styled moderate who has expressed very liberal views and positions in the past, so it will be interesting to see Sinema balance her liberal views in the U.S. Senate with her state’s more conservative profile.

Sen. Jacky Rosen (D-NV)

  • The result: Rosen 50.4%, Heller 45.4%
  • Recent presidential elections in state: Clinton +2.4 (2016), Obama +6.7 (2012), Obama +12.4 (2008)
  • Top donors by industry: law, human rights, education, securities, real estate
  • What she ran on: Named one of Chuck Schumer’s “Women of the West” in a Tuesday tweet, Rosen was the only person to unseat a Republican incumbent in the U.S. Senate this year. Rosen is light on political experience, having only served one, uneventful term in the U.S. House. She’s representing a state that is still ‘purple’ but becoming more liberal, and was one of the few candidates to succeed in 2018 running statewide on a progressive platform.
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