Report: 2016 Ballots Destroyed in Debbie Wasserman-Schultz’s District Report: 2016 Ballots Destroyed in Debbie Wasserman-Schultz’s District – NTK Network

Report: 2016 Ballots Destroyed in Debbie Wasserman-Schultz’s District

A judge ruled late last week that the Broward County elections supervisor broke state and federal law by unlawfully destroying ballots cast in the district.

By NTK Staff | 05.14.2018 @5:00pm
Report: 2016 Ballots Destroyed in Debbie Wasserman-Schultz’s District

Broward County Election Supervisor Brenda Snipes broke state and federal law, a judge ruled last week, when she destroyed ballots cast in Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s (D-FL) 2016 Democratic primary, according to a report from Politico.

Gov. Rick Scott’s administration said they would step in to monitor Snipe’s office going forward:

In light of the ruling, Gov. Rick Scott’s administration — which has expressed concerns with how Broward County Election Supervisor Brenda Snipes has handled the case — told POLITICO that he’s reviewing the judge’s order and will have her office monitored.

“During the upcoming election, the Department of State will send a Florida elections expert from the Division of Elections to Supervisor Snipes’ office to ensure that all laws are followed so the citizens of Broward County can have the efficient, properly run election they deserve,” Scott’s office said in a written statement.

The judge’s ruling was the result of a lawsuit filed by Wasserman Schultz’s 2016 primary opponent, Tim Canova. He has announced plans to run in the district again in 2018, this time as an independent.

“The governor has the power to dismiss Snipes from office for malfeasance and misfeasance,” Canova told Politico. “The judge also pointed to the supervisor’s bad faith for continuing to litigate for months after admitting she destroyed the ballots, which will certainly run up the cost to taxpayers.”

Here are the laws Snipes broke:

Under longstanding federal law, ballots cast in a federal race aren’t supposed to be destroyed until 22 months after the election. And under state law, a public record sought in a court case is not supposed to be destroyed without a judge’s order. Also, state law says public records can’t be “for a period of 30 days after the date on which a written request … was served.”

According to the report, a judge was not persuaded by Snipes’ office making digital copies of the ballots before destroying them.

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