Trump Foe in Mexican Presidential Election Admits Agreement With Him on Several Issues Trump Foe in Mexican Presidential Election Admits Agreement With Him on Several Issues – NTK Network

Trump Foe in Mexican Presidential Election Admits Agreement With Him on Several Issues

Andres Manuel López Obrador has often been cast as the president's antithesis in Mexico, but the candidate offered support for a number of Trump's initiatives.

By NTK Staff | 06.22.2018 @1:00pm
Trump Foe in Mexican Presidential Election Admits Agreement With Him on Several Issues

Mexican presidential candidate Andres Manuel López Obrador has spoken often in opposition to President Donald Trump, once threatening an international lawsuit against the American president and promising to “put him in his place.”

López Obrador is widely expected to win the upcoming election to replace outgoing President Enrique Peña Nieto, possibly setting up a confrontational relationship with Trump.

But the two leaders might agree on more than most might expect. According to The Wall Street Journal, López Obrador has concurred with Trump on more than one occasion on the campaign trail. For instance, the Mexican politician endorsed Trump’s focus on increasing wages in Mexico. The American president has complained that lower wages in our southern neighbor’s economy steal jobs from the United States:

“Oddly enough, I agree with the position that President Donald Trump has expressed on some occasions: We must increase wages in Mexico,” Mr. López Obrador said in a presidential debate last month to discuss foreign policy issues. “We can’t be talking about a trade agreement if there’s no equality in wages.”

In fact, the Mexican candidate’s adviser called Trump’s rhetoric on Mexican wages “music to our ears,” indicating a common ground between the two bombastic politicians:

A key sticking point in negotiations is linked to Mr. Trump’s claim that salary disparities between the two countries are an unfair advantage to Mexico that results in U.S. job losses. In Nafta talks, the U.S. has demanded that a significant part of vehicles manufactured in North America be produced in high-wage zones.

“For us, that’s music to our ears,” said Graciela Márquez, the Harvard-educated economist who has been named by Mr. López Obrador to become economy minister if he wins the election. But reducing wage disparities requires time and a gradual approach within Nafta, said Ms. Márquez.

The two leaders will also agree more broadly on trade issues, with both opposing the Trans Pacific Partnership and wishing to renegotiate NAFTA. While Trump’s and López Obrador’s desires to “win” in negotiations may bring them into conflict, their willingness to renegotiate the free trade agreement could spur talks further after a breakdown in relations between Trump and the current Mexican president.

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