WaPo Editorial Board: Apple Chose China’s ‘Police State’ Over Principles WaPo Editorial Board: Apple Chose China’s ‘Police State’ Over Principles – NTK Network

WaPo Editorial Board: Apple Chose China’s ‘Police State’ Over Principles

For a company that refused the FBI’s requests to unlock a terrorist’s iPhone, Apple’s decision to comply with “mega-snoops” China is, well, odd.

By NTK Staff | 02.28.2018 @10:06am
WaPo Editorial Board: Apple Chose China’s ‘Police State’ Over Principles

The Washington Post editorial board took tech giant Apple to task for its decision to move iCloud storage data from the United States to China in order to comply with “local laws.”

NTK previously covered Apple’s controversial decision to capitulate to and obey laws designed to allow China’s government to spy on its citizens. The fear, and almost guaranteed outcome, is that the government will use that information, which includes text messages, emails, and other user data, to punish dissidents.

Moving the iCloud storage data to China will allow the authoritarian regime to bypass U.S. law and due process. The editorial board further elaborated on how easy it will be for China’s communist leaders to spy on its citizens:

A vivid glimpse of how the mechanism works is China’s recent campaign to silence and punish human rights lawyers, jailing them for defending people who dared speak their minds openly. China is also rolling out a nationwide system to monitor the behavior of individuals, including their financial transactions, shopping habits, social media, traffic tickets and unpaid bills, and combining it with ubiquitous surveillance.

Apple chose to comply with a “police state,” the editorial board wrote late Tuesday. But when the FBI sought to unlock the iPhone of a terrorist who killed 14 and injured dozens more, Apple stood on “principle” and refused the government’s request.

“We need to stand tall and stand tall on principle,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said at the time.

The Washington Post editorial board wants to know: where are those principles now?

“Of course it would have been painful to Apple’s customers, and to its bottom line, to pull out of China,” the editorial board wrote. “But obeying ‘local laws’ can mean honoring the whims of mega-snoops and dictators who do not share the values of democracy and free expression. Apple should find that painful, too.”

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